NCERT Class 9 History Chapter 7 Question Answer Pdf | History and Sport: The Story of Cricket.

In this article, We will learn Class 9 History Chapter 7 Question Answer, History, and Sport: The Story of Cricket. If you want to learn more history Class 9 chapters, we have got you covered.

Class 9 History Chapter 7 Question Answer

Question-1
Describe one way in which in the nineteenth century, technology brought about a change in equipment and give one example where no change in equipment took place?

Answer:
Companies willing to spend enormous sums of money to air advertising for their products in front of cricket’s captive television audience helped television channels make money.

Cricketers became superstars as a result of constant television coverage, and in addition to being paid more by their cricket boards, they now made even more money by appearing in commercials for a variety of things on television, ranging from tires to colas.

Cricket was modified as a result of a television broadcast. By projecting cricket into tiny towns and villages, it increased the game’s audience.

Cricket’s social basis was also enlarged. Children who had never had the opportunity to watch international cricket before because they lived outside of the major cities where it was played could now watch and learn by mimicking their heroes.

Question-2
Explain why cricket became popular in India and the West Indies. Can you give reasons why it did not become popular in countries in South America?

Answer:
While British imperial authorities introduced the game to the colonies, they made little attempt to expand it, especially in colonial regions like India and the West Indies, where the subjects of the empire were primarily non-white.

Playing cricket became a symbol of superior social and racial position in this country, and Afro-Caribbeans were prevented from engaging in organized club cricket, which was still controlled by white plantation owners and their servants.

The first non-white club in the West Indies was founded near the end of the nineteenth century, and its members were light-skinned mulattos as well.

So, while black people played a lot of informal cricket on beaches, in back alleys, and in parks, white elites dominated club cricket until the 1930s.

The fact that England and the other white commonwealth countries, Australia and New Zealand, continued to play Test cricket with South Africa, a racist state that practiced racial segregation that, among other things, barred non-whites (who made up the majority of South Africa’s population) from representing the country in Test matches, demonstrates the colonial flavor of world cricket during the 1950s and 1960s.

Test-playing nations such as India, Pakistan, and the West Indies boycotted South Africa, but they lacked sufficient clout in the International Cricket Council (ICC) to prevent the country from participating in Test cricket.

That only happened when political pressure from newly decolonized Asian and African nations, allied with liberal sentiment in the United Kingdom, prompted the English cricket authorities to cancel a tour by South Africa in 1970.

Question-3
Give brief explanations for the following:
1. The Parsis were the first Indian community to set up a cricket club in India.
2. Mahatma Gandhi condemned the Pentangular tournament.
3. The name of the ICC was changed from the Imperial Cricket Conference to the International Cricket Conference.
4. The significance of the shift of the ICC headquarters from London to Dubai.

Answer:
1. The Parsis Were the First Indian Community to set up a Cricket Club in India.
The beginnings of Indian cricket, that is, cricket played by Indians, can be found in Bombay, and the Parsis, a small community of Zoroastrians, were the first Indian community to begin playing the game.

Because of their interest in trade, the Parsis were the first Indian community to westernize, and they created the first Indian cricket club, the Oriental Cricket Club, in Bombay in 1848.

Parsi businesses like the Tatas and the Wadias financed and sponsored Parsi groups. The white cricket elite in India did not assist the ardent Parsis.

2. Mahatma Gandhi condemned the Pentangular tournament.
The Pentangular was denounced by Mahatma Gandhi as a communally divisive tournament that belonged in a time when nationalists were attempting to reconcile India’s heterogeneous population.

The National Cricket Championship (later renamed the Ranji Trophy) was founded as a regional rival first-class tournament, but it was not until Independence that it fully replaced the Pentangular.

The Pentangular was established on the foundation of the colonial state and its divided vision of India. It was a colonial tournament that died when the Raj came to power.

3. The name of the ICC was changed from the Imperial Cricket Conference to the International Cricket Conference.
The Imperial Cricket Conference (ICC) was still in charge of international cricket rules. The ICC, which was renamed the International Cricket Conference in 1965, was dominated by its founding members, England and Australia, who held a veto over its proceedings.

The privileged status of England and Australia was not abolished until 1989 in favor of equal participation.

4. The Significance of the Shift of the ICC Headquarters from London to Dubai
Satellite television technology is a simple reality that transformed the balance of power in cricket: a process that began with the disintegration of the British Empire was brought to a logical conclusion by globalization.

The game’s center of gravity shifted to South Asia since India has the highest viewership among cricket-playing nations and the largest market in the cricketing world.

The move of the ICC offices from London to tax-free Dubai signified this trend.

Question-4
How have advances in technology, especially television technology, affected the development of contemporary cricket?

Answer :
Cricket has a global market thanks to satellite broadcast technology and multi-national television companies’ global reach. Matches from Sydney can now be streamed live from Surat.

This basic truth altered the power dynamic in cricket: a process that began with the disintegration of the British Empire was brought to a natural conclusion by globalization.

The game’s center of gravity shifted to South Asia since India has the highest viewership among cricket-playing nations and the largest market in the cricketing world.

The move of the ICC offices from London to tax-free Dubai signified this trend. Cricket was modified as a result of a television broadcast.

By projecting cricket into tiny towns and villages, it increased the game’s audience. Cricket’s social basis was also enlarged.

Children who had never had the opportunity to watch international cricket before because they lived outside of the major cities where it was played could now watch and learn by mimicking their heroes.

NCERT Class 9 History Chapter 7 Question Answer ( Short Answers ) | History and Sport: The Story of Cricket

Question 1.
When were the first laws of cricket drawn up? Mention any three such laws.
Or
Mention the first written Laws of Cricket’ drawn up in 1744. [CBSE March 2011,13,15]
Or
Describe the first written laws of cricket. [CBSE March 2011]

Answer:
Cricket’s first codified rules were drafted in 1774.

1. The principals will select two umpires from among the gentlemen present to adjudicate all disagreements.

2. Stumps must be 22 inches tall, with a six-inch bail across them.

3. The size of the balls must be between 5 and 6 ounces.

Question 2.
Mention any three peculiarities of Test Cricket.
Or
Why is cricket called a peculiar game? Give any three reasons. [CBSE 2014]

Answer:
Even if a match lasts five days, it can still conclude in a draw.

There is no information about the size or shape of the ground.

The shape and size of the bat were unrestricted.

Question 3.
“Cricket has changed with changing times and yet fundamentally remained true to its origin in rural England”. Justify by giving examples.

Answer:
1. No ground measuring specification: Despite the fact that the game has been played for over 300 years, there is no ground measurement criteria.

2. Cricket’s most crucial equipment is constructed entirely of natural, pre-industrial materials. The bat, as well as the stumps and bails, are made of wood.

Leather, string, and cork are used to make the ball. Both the bat and the ball are still handcrafted, not mass-produced. The bat’s substance shifted slightly over time.

It was once made from a single piece of wood. It now has two parts: a blade made of willow tree wood and a handle made of cane that became available as European colonialists and trading corporations established themselves in Asia.

Unlike golf and tennis, cricket has refused to employ industrial or man-made materials to recreate its equipment: plastic, fiberglass, and metal have all been ruled out.

3. Protective equipment: Some of the equipment, such as gloves, helmets, and padding, has evolved over time. All of them are made by machines.

Question 4.
The organization of cricket in England reflected the nature of English society. Explain.

Answer:
At the period, England’s society was separated into two classes: rich and poor. In cricket, there was a division as well.

Amateurs were wealthier players who played for fun, whereas professionals were poor players who played for a living.

Similar to how most administrative laws favored the wealthy, most cricket laws favored batsmen because amateurs tended to be batsmen.

The poor did the most of the hard work, and the professionals did the fielding and bowling in cricket.

Only the wealthy had the authority to govern, and in cricket, only the batsmen were appointed captains.

Question 5.
Mention any three features of post packer game of cricket.

Cricket became a commercially viable sport.

After the Oackergame, colored clothing, protective helmets, field limitations, and cricket under lights became standard.

Cricket was broadcast on television in small towns and villages.

Question 6.
‘Cricket in India was organized on the principle of race and religion.’ Justify.
Or
How was cricket used by the Britishers to spread their policy of racism?

Answer:
When the Bombay Gymkhana and the Parsi players clashed over the use of a public park, the Britishers sided with Bombay. Gymkhana.

They saw religious communities as distinct national-irascible entities. That is why they used to approve club applications based on community.

Pentangular tournaments were favored because they were based on communities.

First-class cricket was also based on racial and communal sanctions.

The teams who competed in colonial India’s finest and most famous first-class cricket tournament represented religious groupings rather than regions.

Question 7.
‘The center of gravity in cricket has shifted away from the old Anglo- Australian axis.’ Justify by giving examples. [CBSE 2015]

Answer:
Cricket’s headquarters have been relocated from London to Dubai, which is tax-free.

Right now, England and Australia have no veto power.

The subcontinental teams of India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka have largely been responsible for innovations such as the IPL, doosra, and reverse swing.

Among the cricket-playing nations, India boasts the largest audience for the game, as well as the world’s largest market.

NCERT Class 9 history chapter 7 Extra questions ( Long Answers ) | History and Sport: The Story of Cricket

Question 1.
Explain the journey of cricket progress in India.

Answer:
(i) Cricket in its early stages: In colonial India, cricket was organized on the basis of race and religion. The first evidence of cricket being played in India is from 1721 when England sailors in Cambay played recreational cricket.

(ii) Cricket Clubs: In 1792, the Calcutta Cricket Club became the first Indian club. Cricket was almost entirely a sport played by the British military and civil personnel in all-white clubs and gymkhanas in India during the eighteenth century.

(iii) Parsi Cricket: Parsis were the first in India to play cricket. Because of their interest in trade and western education, they were close to the British. In 1848, they established the Oriental Cricket Club in Bombay, and later the Parsi Gymkhana.

(iv) Clubs founded by other communities: The Parsi Gymkhana set a precedent for other Indians to create clubs based on the concept of a religious community.

Hindus and Muslims were actively collecting finances and support for a Hindu Gymkhana and an Islam Gymkhana by the 1890s. Colonial India was not considered a country by the British.

(v) Quadrangular Tournament: Because of the history of gymkhana cricket, first-class cricket is now organized on racial and communal lines. The teams who competed in colonial India’s most famous and prestigious first-class cricket tournament did not represent regions, as do teams in today’s Ranji Trophy, but religious communities.

The competition was formerly known as the Quadrangular because four teams competed: Europeans, Parsis, Hindus, and Muslims. When a fifth team, the Rest, was added, it became the Pentangular, which included all the remaining communities, such as the Indian Christians.

Question 2.
What changes were brought by (MCC) Marylebone Cricket Club-in cricket laws in the latter half of the 18th century? [CBSE 2015]
Or
Mention any three changes brought about in the game of Cricket by the MCC’s revision of the laws during the second half of the 18th century. [CBSE March 2011]

Answer:
Instead of rolling the ball along the ground, it was decided to pitch it into the air. It allowed bowlers the option of adding length, deception through the air, and speed.

1. The straight bat took the place of the curved bat.

2. The ball’s weight was regulated to 51/2 to 53/4 ounces, while the bat’s breadth was limited to four inches.

3. The first leg before the wicket law was published in 1774.

4. A third stump became prevalent around the same time.

5. Three days had become the standard for important matches by 1780.

Question 3.
“The social and economic history of England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, cricket’s early years, shaped the game and gave cricket its unique nature.” Explain. [CBSE 2014]

Answer:
Cricket and rural life: The length of a Test match demonstrates cricket’s ties to rural history. Cricket matches used to have no time limit.

The game lasted as long as it took to bowl out each team twice. Village life moved at a slower pace, and cricket regulations were established before the Industrial Revolution.

Cricket’s vagueness about the size of a cricket ground is a product of its village beginnings, just as its vagueness about the size of a cricket ground is a result of its village origins! Cricket was first played on country commons, which were unfenced public lands.

There were no defined boundaries or boundary hits because the size of the commons changed from village to village.

Cricket’s tools: The majority of cricket’s essential tools are constructed of natural, pre-industrial materials. The bat, as well as the stumps and bails, are made of wood. Leather, string, and cork are used to make the ball.

Cricket players were also separated into groups based on their social and economic position.

The wealthy who could afford to play for fun were referred to as amateurs, while the poor who played for a living were referred to as professionals.

Cricket and the British Empire: Team sports like cricket and rugby were used to teach English lads discipline, hierarchy, skills, codes of honor, and leadership traits that helped them establish and administer the British empire.

Question 4.
How have advances in technology, especially television technology, affected the development of contemporary cricket?

Answer:
Broadening the audience: Cricket has been transformed by television coverage. New cricket is being broadcast on practically every continent.
By broadcasting cricket into tiny towns and villages, it has increased the game’s audience.

1. Cricket has become a massive business because of television. Colored uniforms, safety helmets, field restrictions, and cricket underbelly brawls all became part of the Post Packer game.

Cricket boards made money by selling television rights to broadcasters. Television stations make money by selling commercial spots to corporations willing to pay a lot of money to have advertised for their products aired in front of cricket’s captive television audience.

Continuous television coverage has turned players into celebrities who, in addition to being paid more by their cricket boards, are now earning even more money by appearing in advertisements for a variety of things on television, ranging from tires to colas.

2. Changes in the center of gravity: In cricket, television has changed the power balance. The game’s center of gravity shifted to South Asia since India has the highest viewership among cricket-playing nations and the largest market in the cricketing world. The move of the ICC offices from London to tax-free Dubai signified this trend.

3. The International Cricket Council (ICC), the game’s governing body, has mandated that all international matches be televised. The third empire is now in play, and television is being used to better the game.

Question 5.
The Parsis were the first Indian community to set up a cricket club in India. Explain their contribution to cricket. [CBSE March 2011]

Answer:
The Parsis, a small Zoroastrian community, were the first Indian community to play cricket. In 1848, they established the first Indian cricket club, the Oriental Cricket Club, in Bombay (Mumbai). The following were the main reasons for this:

1. Because of their interest in trade, they became acquainted with the British.

2. They were the first Indian community to become westernized and study English literature and language.
To play cricket, they created their own Gymkhana.

3. In 1889, a Parsi cricket squad defeated a British cricket team. They were ecstatic at their victory, and it filled their hearts and souls with joy.

4. As a result, the Parsis became the forefathers of Indian cricket. Other Indians were inspired by their example to form their own groups.

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